East Coast Girls: Q & A with Author Kerry Kletter

I am literally counting the minutes to read the sophomore novel of the amazing Kerry Kletter. Literally. Because I know East Coast Girls (MIRA, May 26, 2020) will be wonderful. Her writing is from the heart. Lyrical, poetic, painful, and beautiful. I expect nothing less from East Coast Girls.

Here’s a description from Kletter’s website:

They share countless perfect memories—and one they wish they could forget.

Childhood friends Hannah, Maya, Blue and Renee share a bond that feels more like family. Growing up, they had difficult home lives, and the summers they spent vacationing together in Montauk were the happiest memories they ever made—campfires on the beach, salt-spray hair and the effervescent excitement of the bright future ahead. Then, the summer after graduation, one terrible night changed everything.

Twelve years have passed since that fateful incident, and during that time, their sisterhood has drifted apart, each woman haunted by her own lost innocence. But just as they reunite in Montauk for one last summer together, hoping to heal those wounds and find happiness once more, tragedy strikes again. This time it’ll test them like never before, forcing them to confront decisions they’ve each had to live with and old secrets that refuse to stay buried.

Told with lyrical prose and sharp insights into human nature, East Coast Girls unveils the dark truths that can threaten even the deepest friendships and the unconditional love that makes them stronger than ever.

I had the pleasure of doing an email Q & A with Kletter about the novel and her writing life. Here are the highlights:

EZ: You know I’m a big fan of your debut young adult novel, The First Time She Drowned. You had me at the first line (which I won’t spoil for others who haven’t yet read it). And I’m thrilled your sophomore novel, East Coast Girls, is out. What was the impetus to write it—and to write for an adult audience?

KK: First, thank you! You have been a wonderful champion of my first book and I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it.

You know when I published that book I felt such an outpouring of love and support from people from all aspects of my life and in particular the friends I grew up with on the east coast. Friends have always been a saving grace in my life and that support meant everything to me. I wanted to find a way to express my gratitude and so I decided to write a book that was, to me, a love letter to friendship. EAST COAST GIRLS is about a lot of other things as well—trauma, resiliency, compassion for our flawed humanity—but at its heart it’s about the beauty of lifelong friends.

As far as writing for an adult audience, my first book was technically considered a crossover novel—meaning that it might appeal to both young adults and adults so I didn’t really feel like I was leaping genres too much even though they are calling this my adult debut.

EZ: How was the process of writing East Coast Girls different from writing your first novel?

KK: I think second novels are harder in some way because now you have all the voices from the first book in your head—what sells, what readers like and don’t, what their expectations might be. It was tough to get past all of that and just write the story I wanted to tell.

EZ: What was the most challenging part of writing this novel in terms of craft and logistics?

 

 

KK: Having three narrators with three distinct personalities. Oy.

EZ: What was the best part of writing this novel?

KK: I think the thing I always like most about writing is that it allows me to grapple with questions I’m struggling with in my own life. In this book I was looking to answer two questions: “How do we acknowledge and accept the fragility of life and the fear of loss and still live and love fearlessly?” And then separately, “How do we cope with the fact that sometimes the people we love most cause us great pain and how do we know when to forgive and when to let go?” I feel like I learn by asking the question and letting the characters figure it out. Not that there are any easy answers, of course.

EZ: What do you need in terms of physical space and inspiration to sit down to write? And where and in what conditions do you do your best writing?

KK: A bed (my office), earplugs, laptop. I think I do my best writing after I’ve read really good writing. I’m always inspired by beautiful sentences.

EZ: What are some of your favorite recent reads?

KK: I loved Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano which I thought was beautiful and life-affirming and so carefully done. My Dark Vanessa by Kate Elizabeth Russell was a perfect book, just perfectly structured, absorbing, well written, honest. A lighter read I loved was Emily Henry’s Beach Read which is hilarious and swoony and has depth as well. It’s set to be a huge and well-loved book which thrills me because Emily happens to be an incredible person.

EZ: What novels are you most looking forward to diving into?

KK: I cannot wait for Stephanie Danler’s memoir Stray. I loved her first Sweet Bitter so much. I also really want A Star is Bored by Byron Lane, The Paris Hours by Alex George and Christina Clancy’s The Second Home. As for young adult novels, Jennifer Niven has a new one out in the fall called Breathless. I love everything she writes. And I’m looking forward to Laurie Elizabeth Flynn’s All Eyes on Her and Marisa Reichardt’s Aftershocks.

EZ: What most inspires your writing/story ideas?

KK: Honestly, mostly just life. Other books sometimes, but yeah mostly life.

EZ: How has the current pandemic affected your creative/writing life?

KK: I’m being surprisingly productive! Writing is such a focused activity—I use it to help regulate myself and forget the big problems of the world for a while. It gives me a sense of purpose and meaning as well.

EZ: When you’re not writing, how do you like to spend your time—pre-covid-19 and during the pandemic?

KK: Pre-covid—spending time with friends, running, surfing, skiing, reading, binging netflx. During covid—running (mask on!) writing, binging Netflix, and much-needed organizing of my apartment. And in both cases too much Twitter.

EZ: How can friends, family, other authors and fans support you and your work during the pandemic? Where can they find you online?

KK: Obviously there are much bigger problems in the world, but it is an unfortunate time to be releasing a book. It’s harder for new books to get traction when all the bookstores are closed, book tours and events cancelled, and there are no booksellers handselling your book or even opportunities for people to impulse buy off the shelf. I never want anyone to feel they have to do anything to support me, but if they wanted to I’d be thrilled of course if anyone bought the book or asked their local library to buy it if they haven’t yet. Beyond that, social media posts and recommendations to friends are incredibly helpful in spreading the word—my friends, fellow authors and readers have always been so amazing with that and I’m so grateful. And, of course, Amazon reviews are always helpful. Unless you hated the book in which case, not so much 😊.

I can be found on Instagram and Twitter as @Kkletter, and on Facebook under Kerry Kletter. My website is Kerrykletter.com.

EZ: What’s next for Kerry Kletter?

KK: Finishing the third book, trying not to go stir crazy, and awaiting YOUR first novel.

EZ: Where would you like people to buy your books?

KK: I want people to shop where they want to but, if they are able, I encourage them to buy from their local independent bookstore or from Bookshop.org which supports indies. Those stores really need us right now and I’m very worried about publishing if we lose them.

Read an excerpt of East Coast girls here.

 

You Are Not What We Expected: Meet Sidura Ludwig

A writer of short stories, novels, picture books, and nonfiction as well as a teacher and communications expert, author Sidura Ludwig is a force. I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know the lovely and talented Ludwig during our journey as candidates for an MFA in writing for children and young adults at Vermont College of Fine Arts in beautiful Montpelier. And I cannot wait to get my hands on and devour my preordered copy of her latest published work, You Are Not What We Expected (Astoria), when it launches on May 5, 2020.

The short story collection is described on Ludwig’s website as follows:

Spanning fifteen years in the lives of a multi-generational family and their neighbours, this remarkable collection draws an intimate portrait of a suburban Jewish community and illuminates the unexpected ways we remain connected during times of change.

When Uncle Isaac moves back from L.A. to the quiet suburb of Thornhill, Ontario, to help his sister, Elaine Levine, care for her suddenly motherless grandchildren, he finds himself embroiled in even more neighbourhood drama than he would like. Meanwhile, a nanny miles from her own family in the Philippines, cares for a young boy who doesn’t fit in at school. A woman in mid-life contends with the task of cleaning out the house in which she grew up, while her teenage son struggles with why his dad moved out. And down the street, a mother and her two daughters prepare for a wedding and transitions they didn’t see coming. This stunningly intimate collection of stories, which spans fifteen years in the lives of the Levine family, is an exquisite portrait of a Jewish community, the secular and religious families who inhabit it, and the tensions that exist there.

I had the pleasure of doing an email Q and A with Ludwig about her latest work and life as a writer–especially during a pandemic! Here are highlights from our exchange:

 

EZ: When did you first know you were a writer?

SL: I have always wanted to BE a writer and I have always taken my writing seriously. Even as a teenager, I made a point of writing every day, at least two pages. I don’t know if I knew then that I was a writer, but I knew I wanted a writing life. So, I’ve been chasing this label for 44 years! For a while now I have been able to call myself a writer without feeling like I’m an imposter. But I can’t say for sure when that first started.

EZ: What drew you to VCFA to pursue an MFA in writing for children and young adults?

SL: I started taking online courses to challenge myself with my writing. I enrolled in an online Intro to Writing for Children class through the University of Toronto. I just fell in love with the material. It was like a wake-up call. I tried writing picture books for the first time, and I couldn’t get enough of it. Same with YA. The more I wrote, the more I wanted to try. At the same time, I attended the AWP conference in Tampa and made a point of going to all the panels on writing for children. Every panel had at least one representative from VCFA, so I figured I should check this place out. Then I met Ann Cardinal (Director of Student Recruitment). And no one can say no to Ann! She suggested I come down to campus for a few days to check it out. I did and I was hooked. I couldn’t wait to become a part of this vibrant, supportive writing community.

EZ: Your new short story collection, You Are Not What We Expected, is likely to resonate with so many—especially as many of us are hunkered down during this pandemic. What inspired you to write this specific collection of stories, and what do you think those who grapple with the meaning and impact of this time of immense change—being sheltered-in-place alone or with family—can glean from the book? What are its key takeaways? 

SL: This book started out as a novel, but it wasn’t going anywhere. I had something like 300 pages of rambling nothing. At the time my youngest child was two years old. I suddenly realized if I didn’t have the energy or attention span to read a novel, how did I think I could write one? I shifted to short stories because they are my first love, and I need the satisfaction of starting and finishing what I was saying. I used the same characters from the novel but explored their journeys through short fiction. I then expanded as I wondered about their neighbours and the other people interacting with them. So that’s how the collection came to be.

In terms of what people can glean from this book at this time…this is a book about family and about looking inwards. What’s happening within the homes in a close-knit suburban community. It’s also about characters who each find themselves at a place they didn’t expect to be. But they move forward regardless. I hope that resonates with readers right now. Because really, none of us expected to be here in a pandemic!

EZ: How was the experience writing this work different from writing your debut novel, Holding My Breath?

SL: Just the other day I realized that these two books mirror each other: Holding My Breath started out as a collection of short stories and then became a novel; and this one started out as a novel and then became a collection of short stories!

The experience of writing this book was totally different because I’m in a completely different place in my life. I have three kids and I write full-time. My first book I wrote while living overseas before we had any children. I wrote it over three years of Sundays while I worked full-time in communications. I suppose in both cases I had to make a point of carving out writing time and being strict about getting my butt in the chair, no excuses. Butt in the chair is really key for me. I may not know what I’m going to write, but I’m halfway there if I sit down when I say I’m going to sit down, instead of waiting to feel inspired.

EZ: How has your writing life changed since the pandemic, both in terms of practice and your ability to focus?

SL: SO MUCH!! Oh, where do I start? First, I’m used to having the house to myself during the day while I work. Now everyone is home (three kids and a husband) and there’s just so much activity. And expectation. I’ll try to write an email and I’ll get interrupted seven times. Mostly, I miss having the time and space to be alone with my thoughts. I’ve taken to waking up early so that I can have at least an hour when everyone else is still sleeping. I journal. Stare out the window. Drink a cup of tea. I just need some quiet time to settle myself.

The other major change is having to administer my youngest child’s distance learning. His school has been amazing at adapting to using Zoom, etc. But he’s only in Grade 2 and he’s not yet an independent learner. That means I’m his teacher once the Zoom meetings end. I’m not good at multi-tasking. So, when I have one ear on his work, it’s not like I can be writing away. We’ve worked it out that my husband takes over from 3 to 6pm and looks after supper time. At least I can get a chunk of concentrated work time each day, even if it’s not as much as I had before.

EZ: Where do you typically like to write, and what are must-haves in your workspace?

SL: I have a writing office in our bedroom. There’s an L-shaped desk with a standing desk, a kneeling chair (for when I want to sit) and then—my favourite—a bean bag chair. A few years ago, I rearranged my office so that I could have a more dynamic working space and I wasn’t sitting so much. This set up is much better for my back and hips.

In terms of what I need: a journal, a good flowing pen (preferably blue), a cup of tea and a full water bottle. My dog, Ella, usually joins me. She’s the only one who can be in the room and not distract me. Of course, she’s mostly sleeping on the floor…

EZ: Given the uncertainties of in-person book promotion, how can readers learn from and support your work and that of other writers until in-person appearances are possible?

SL: I’m making a point of buying books that are launching right now. It’s really hard for writers to not be able to book in-person events. So, buying their books now is even more important than ever in terms of supporting writers. I’m trying hard to connect with my audience through social media. Following up-and-coming writers on social media is also a great way of showing support. Writers, like everyone else, are having to be creative in terms of how they get their work out there during this time. I’m hosting a weekly Thursday night challah bake on Facebook Live called Kneading and Reading. I walk people through how to make and braid challah, and I read a short passage from my book. I take questions. It’s a lot of fun and it feels like an authentic way for me to put myself out there.

EZ: What are your post-graduation writing plans? (What are you working on?)

SL: You mean I have to graduate?

I’m just finishing my third semester and then I’m taking a semester off to focus on book promotion. So, I’m still a year away from post-graduation writing plans. When I do graduate, I hope to have a body of work that I’m excited about so I’ll be motivated to keep revising until I feel I’ve said what I need to.

EZ: Any advice for new/aspiring writers?

SL: Just get your butt in the chair every day. Even if you stare at the wall while your journal and pen lie on the table in front of you. Getting into a writing routine is key if you want to live a writing life. Treat your writing self seriously. Even if you find it hard to call yourself a writer right now, act like one by always making time for your writing. The inspiration will follow.

EZ: Where can people find and support your work?

SL: Anywhere books are sold! I love independent bookstores, so please consider ordering from your local bookseller. If you don’t have a local bookseller, you can find my book on Amazon or any other online bookselling platform.

Visit Sidura’s website here. You can also find her on Twitter at @SiduraLudwig, and on Facebook. (And don’t forget: you can also bake challah with her as she reads from her work on Facebook Live on Thursdays.)

 

 

Q & A with Debut YA Novelist Laura Taylor Namey

Laura Taylor Namey is a woman on a mission. This dog loving, piano playing, former teacher is a mother of two and full time writer. She aspires to live in London someday, but right now is truly living the dream (and working her a** off) as the debut author of the brand new young adult novel, The Library of Lost Things (Inkyard Press, October 2019). Here’s a description of the novel from Goodreads:

From the moment she first learned to read, literary genius Darcy Wells has spent most of her time living in the worlds of her books. There, she can avoid the crushing reality of her mother’s hoarding and pretend her life is simply ordinary. But when a new property manager becomes more active in the upkeep of their apartment complex, the only home Darcy has ever known outside of her books suddenly hangs in the balance.

While Darcy is struggling to survive beneath the weight of her mother’s compulsive shopping, Asher Fleet, a former teen pilot with an unexpectedly shattered future, walks into the bookstore where she works…and straight into her heart. For the first time in her life, Darcy can’t seem to find the right words. Fairy tales are one thing, but real love makes her want to hide inside her carefully constructed ink-and-paper bomb shelter.

Still, after spending her whole life keeping people out, something about Asher makes Darcy want to open up. But securing her own happily-ever-after will mean she’ll need to stop hiding and start living her own truth—even if it’s messy.

I had the pleasure of doing an email interview with my lovely friend whom I had the pleasure of meeting several years ago at a Society for Children’s Book Authors and Illustrators annual conference. Read on to learn about her writing journey and why she loves #pitchwars and her critique partners (not necessarily in that order).

EZ: At what point in your life did you know you wanted to write for children and young adults? And when did you know you were a writer?

LTN: I have always felt like a natural writer, even if I didn’t have the logistics figured out until a few years ago. I am a former teacher, and I found myself using a lot of literature in my classroom lessons. I began to long for the chance to write my own stories. About five years ago, I started writing a young adult novel (this one will forever live in a drawer). I’d had no formal training, but I used that work to find out what I really did need to work on more. I got help, read a ton, and decided that I wanted to focus on the young adult age group. I love the emphasis on coming-of-age themes, high-concept storytelling, and exploring complex and relevant topics.

EZ: What has been the best part of  transitioning from a pre-published to a published author?

LTN: I have such admiration and respect for career authors, and creators who consistently come up with beautiful and compelling content. Being able to take my small place beside them, with the word Published next to my name, is an incredible experience.

EZ: How do you fit writing into the rest of your life (and fit the rest of your life into your writing)?

LTN: I am blessed to have a supportive family, and the opportunity to write full time right now. I work best in the morning, so having a new teen driver in my home has helped to free up some of my time to build up my word count before lunch time. I take breaks to take care of my home and family, and to squeeze in a workout. Admittedly, I don’t watch a lot of TV. I am usually writing, or reading during down time.

EZ: What are your favorite kinds of books to read, and how do they inspire your writing?

LTN: I love books that stick with me long after I’ve finished them. I enjoy a wide variety of authors, age groups, and genres. Make me care, feel, and want to chat about your book all day and that’s my idea of a winner. I believe all writers need to actively read other writers. I am most inspired by other authors in the areas of scope and opportunity. There are so many ways to attack and deconstruct even the same topic in drastically different ways with differing points of view. Reading more only confirms my belief that so many possibilities lay in front of our pens.

EZ: Can you describe your experience with #pitchwars on Twitter?

LTN: I was a 2017 #pitchwars unofficial mentee. Besides working with a fantastic mentor who became the first person to work on THE LIBRARY OF LOST THINGS, #pitchwars brought me into a supportive community of writers. This is the real prize in any online contest. Put your work out there. Meet fellow writers. Team up and share and hone your craft together, and know that you are not alone in your struggles and hopes.

EZ: You are a big fan of your critique partners. How did you meet them, and what makes your partnership work? What advice do you have for other writers who want to work with critique partners or groups?

LTN: I have two fantastic critique partners that work with me almost every day. We met because we were all 2017 #pitchwars unofficial mentees. We began chatting privately on Twitter DM, and became lifelong friends through sharing our work and supporting one another. What sets our group apart is that we don’t wait until we finish a novel to edit or weigh in. We are always working together on our three individual manuscripts. We plan together from idea-up, talk through issues, name towns or characters, and share snippets of our writing as we go. When I get stuck, I can ask a question directly from the point of concern. My partners already have such a deep knowledge of my manuscript, plot and theme, and character arcs, that they can weigh in quickly. And I do the same for their work.

For those who would like to join or form a group like this, hang out on private writer’s boards or the community groups associated with social media programs, such as #pitchwars. Put yourself out there. It might take some time, but you will find your people. It’s okay if you try out a CP and that person isn’t quite right for you. Keep sharing and investing in others.

How will you know if you are collaborating with the best people for you? Your perfect CPs will be similar enough to you and your work that they share a taste level and basic skill level. But they should be different enough that they can expand your scope and contribute to your growth. A good CP walks beside you, while also possessing the tools to push you. My CPs and I are the best of friends, but when it’s time to work, we give tough feedback with love.

EZ: What are you currently working on? And where do you see yourself in five years?

LTN: Right now I am almost finished with the draft of a secret junior novel. I’m hanging out in the young adult contemporary world for a while, and hope to have a few books side-by-side on shelves in five years.

To learn more about Laura Taylor Namey and The Library of Lost Things, visit her website. You can also find her on Twitter and on Instagram. Stay tuned for Namey’s sophomore novel, A Cuban Girl’s Guide to Sweaters and Stars (Simon & Schuster, Fall ’20) and future titles as well!

 

The Art of Breaking Things: Q & A with Laura Sibson

The Art of Breaking Things (Viking Books for Young Readers, June 2019) by debut author Laura Sibson tells the story of 17-year-old Skye, an artist set to leave her small town and attend art school once she figures out how to survive senior year and confront the trauma she experienced several years earlier. Here’s a brief description of the novel from Sibson’s website:

Weekends are for partying with friends while trying to survive the mindnumbingness that is high school. The countdown to graduation is on, and Skye has her sights set on escaping to art school and not looking back. 

But her party-first-ask-questions-later lifestyle starts to crumble when her mom rekindles her romance with the man who betrayed Skye’s trust and boundaries when he was supposed to be protecting her. She was too young to understand what was happening at the time, but now she doesn’t know whether to run as far away from him as possible or give up her dreams to save her little sister. The only problem is that no one knows what he did to her. How can she reveal the secret she’s guarded for so long?

With the help of her best friend and the only boy she’s ever trusted, Skye might just find the courage she needs to let her art speak for her when she’s out of words. After years of hiding her past, she must become her own best ally.

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When I Was Summer: Q & A with J.B. Howard

When I heard about J.B. Howard’s debut novel, When I Was Summer (Viking Books for Young Readers, April 30, 2019) and saw the absolutely gorgeous book cover, I began counting the days until it would be in my hands. Intrigued by the promise of music and mystery (maybe some mating too?!), I pre-ordered the novel and anxiously await its arrival. If it turns out to be anything at all like its author–because what work of fiction doesn’t include at least part of the soul from which it comes–I can’t imagine it’ll be anything less than awesome.

Here’s a description of When I Was Summer from the publisher:

A relatable novel about unrequited love, rock ‘n’ roll, and what you find when you go searching for yourself.

Sixteen-year-old Nora Wakelin has always felt like an outsider in her own family. Her parents and older sister love her, but they don’t understand anything about her: not her passion for music, not her all-encompassing crush on her bandmate Daniel (who is very much unavailable), not her recklessness and impulsiveness. Nora has always imagined that her biological mother might somehow provide the answer as to why she feels like such an outsider.

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How to Make Friends With the Dark: Q & A with Kathleen Glasgow

Grief. It’s universal, but something that each of us experiences in our own way. And while there’s no real antidote for managing the pain of losing someone or something we love, books that tackle the topic with heart, authenticity and gorgeous writing can help us feel heard and understood. And maybe even make life feel a bit more bearable if not beautiful.

Following her raw and riveting debut (and bestselling) novel, Girl in Pieces, Kathleen Glasgow delivers on all counts with her young adult novel, How to Make Friends With the Dark (Delacorte Press, April 2019).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Our Year of Maybe: Q & A with Rachel Lynn Solomon

If you’re looking for a new young adult book title to add to your TBR list, Our Year of Maybe (Simon Pulse, January 15, 2019) by Rachel Lynn Solomon may be a great addition. Already earning a starred review from School Library Journal, Our Year of Maybe examines the complicated aftermath of a kidney transplant between best friends.

Here’s a description of the book from Solomon’s website:

Aspiring choreographer Sophie Orenstein would do anything for Peter Rosenthal-Porter, who’s been on the kidney transplant list as long as she’s known him. Peter, a gifted pianist, is everything to Sophie: best friend, musical collaborator, secret crush. When she learns she’s a match, donating a kidney is an easy, obvious choice. She can’t help wondering if after the transplant, he’ll love her back the way she’s always wanted. read more…

Dear Evan Hansen: The Novel-Q & A with Val Emmich

When I heard that my all-time favorite Broadway musical*, Dear Evan Hansen, was going to be made into a young adult novel, my heart swelled. Not only do I love reading YA books, but I’m working on two of my own as I pursue an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults at Vermont College of Fine Arts. I was excited for us DEH fans to have a different way to enjoy the overwhelming and satisfying experience that is Dear Evan Hansen. But mostly, I was excited for this novel way (see what I did?!) to share the story with teens and adults who may not get to see the show in person. The book (along with the soundtrack) are truly excellent surrogates that can be enjoyed again and again.

Despite the daunting task of turning a brilliant Tony- and Grammy award-winning musical into a YA book, Val Emmich—with book writer extraordinaire, Steven Levenson, and the dynamic, Oscar-winning duo, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul—did it. The book is wonderful. It’s moving. It touches your heart. I was admittedly very nervous to read it, because how could it measure up to the Broadway musical? But any fears I had about the novel not being able to capture the magic of the stage production disappeared in an instant. Like the show, the novel made me laugh and cry. And, like the show, it’s one I will be sure to visit again.

After fan-girling over Emmich, Levinson, Pasek and Paul at both BookCon last spring and at the Dear Evan Hansen: the Novel book launch this month (see photos below), I had the pleasure of doing an email Q & A with the multi-talented Emmich.

At BookCon 2018. From left to right: Justin Paul, Benj Pasek, Steven Levenson & Val Emmich.

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Bedside Manners: Q & A with Heather Frimmer, M.D.

At the most recent BookCon in New York City, I had the pleasure of sitting next to Heather Frimmer (and her adorable, precocious son, Jonah) at the Dear Evan Hansen The Novel book panel.

Any fans of Dear Evan Hansen–the musical OR novel–are friends of mine!

Besides fanning over Pasek & Paul, Steven Levenson and Val Emmich, we spoke about respective writing journeys. A radiologist by day, and writer whenever she can fit it into her busy family life, Frimmer could not be more excited for the birth of her debut novel, Bedside Manners (SparkPress, October 2018). Here’s a description:

As Joyce Novak’s daughter, Marnie, completes medical school and looks ahead to a surgical internship, her wedding, and a future filled with promise, a breast cancer diagnosis throws Joyce’s own future into doubt. Always the caregiver, Joyce feels uncomfortable in the patient role, especially with her husband and daughter. As she progresses through a daunting treatment regimen including a biopsy, lumpectomy, and radiation, she distracts herself by planning Marnie’s wedding.

When the sudden death of a young heroin addict in Marnie’s care forces Marnie to come face-to-face with mortality and her professional inadequacies, she also realizes she must strike a new balance between her identity as a doctor and her role as a supportive daughter. At the same time, she struggles with the stark differences between her fiancé’s family background and her own and comes to understand the importance of being with someone who shares her values and experiences.

Amid this profound soul-searching, both Joyce and Marnie’s futures change in ways they never would have expected.

Here’s a Q & A with Frimmer about her book and writing life:

How does it feel to be a debut novelist and published author?

It’s exhilarating and exciting, but at the same time I still can’t believe it’s happening. The fact that people I don’t know are holding my book in their hands and reading my words is hard to believe and a bit scary. I am proud of my accomplishment and completely hooked on writing fiction. Also, the community of women’s fiction authors and book bloggers has been so welcoming and supportive. With social media, I feel the love for my book even while sitting at home at my writing desk.

When did you first have an inkling to write a book? And was this book the result of that first spark/idea?

To exercise the right side of my brain, I signed up for an introductory writing class at Westport Writers’ Workshop. On the last day of class, my instructor asked me to come up with writing goals. When I said I planned to write a few short stories, she asked if I could write a novel. I promptly informed her she was crazy, but I couldn’t get her suggestion out of my mind. Being a driven, type-A personality, I immediately started writing what would become Bedside Manners. I joined a writing workshop class which definitely helped me see the novel to completion.

I also have to give credit to my husband, Ben. With his characteristic humor, he suggested “colostomy” as the first word of my novel. That silly suggestion got me going and a colostomy bag still makes an appearance in the first chapter!

Did you have a formal writing process or some kind of schedule you followed to get it done? 

I wrote whenever I had time—sometimes after work or on weekend mornings, but most of my writing happened on Wednesdays, my day off. I didn’t typically set a word count or particular goal. I just wrote the part of the story that flowed at the moment. I tried to end my writing sessions with a small part of the next chapter done to make it easier to pick up the next time. Sharing four pages with my writing workshop every week also kept me on task.

How do you balance your day job with writing time? 

It’s not easy. I work full time as a radiologist and spend a large portion of my day in a dark room staring at mammograms, x-rays and CT scans. When I’m not at work, I try to write, edit, read, spend time with my family, take care of errands, and sleep. It’s a constant struggle and one or all of these things often goes by the wayside despite my best efforts.

What’s are you reading now, and what’s in your to-be-read pile?

In the past few years since I began my publication journey, I’ve been reading books by female authors almost exclusively. I am currently reading The Book of Essie by Meghan MacLean Weir, a fellow physician writer. The writing is wonderful and the story is completely unique and fascinating.

Because I also write book reviews for Books INK and for my blog, my TBR pile is always sky high. I am also a sucker for e-book deals and a dedicated library patron. Suffice it to say that I have more books than I could ever read. Up next, I would like to read Unbroken Threads by Jennifer Klepper, a novel about an attorney who represents a Syrian woman seeking asylum. The Cast by Amy Blumenfeld, and advanced copies of The Rain Watcher by Tatiana de Rosnay and Forget You Know Me by Jessica Strawser are also up soon. A hopeless book addict, I could go on forever about what I’ve read and want to read.

Where do you most like to write?

I created a beautiful writing and reading nook in my family room which I rarely use because it’s too quiet. A bit of activity and background noise actually helps me focus. I wrote most of Bedside Manners at the Barnes and Noble café in Westport, CT powered by a large iced coffee, my other addiction.

Do you have any advice for other writers who want to write a book?

Cast away the self-doubt and don’t fall prey to impostor syndrome. If you have an idea and the perseverance to sit down and put in the work, you can write a book. Expect it to be difficult and frustrating, but the work will ultimately pay off in so many ways. Becoming a writer has added amazing depth and richness to my life and I cherish the people I’ve met along the way.

To learn more about Heather Frimmer and Bedside Manners, visit her website. (And here’s a recent AP article about her journey, and a piece on her recent book launch at Barnes and Noble in Westport, CT.)  

 

 

Have More Fun in Bed with Mr. Nice Guy

If you’re looking to have more fun in someone else’s bed (no cheating required), look no further than Mr. Nice Guy (St. Martin’s Press, 2018) by Jennifer Miller and Jason Feifer. At their recent New York City book launch*, the real-life couple and dynamic writing duo—Miller is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Styles section and Jason Feifer is editor-in-chief of Entrepeneurtold a packed house how, on a whim, they sent an early copy of Mr. Nice Guy to Kevin Kwan, author of Crazy Rich Asians. To their great surprise, he later blurbed the book: “I COULD NOT PUT THIS BOOK DOWN! It totally messed up my week, it messed up my deadlines, but I absolutely loved it.”

Kwan is not alone in his endorsement. Publisher’s Weekly calls Mr. Nice Guy a “witty romp through the allegedly glamorous world of magazines” that’s “sharp and satisfying” and “will have readers turning the pages quickly to get the latest dishy details.” And buckle up: Mr. Nice Guy may soon appear on the small screen!

Here’s a brief description of Mr. Nice Guy:

Lucas Callahan gave up his law degree, fiancée and small-town future for a shot at making it in the Big Apple. He snags an entry-level job at Empire magazine, believing it’s only a matter of time before he becomes a famous writer. And then late one night in a downtown bar he meets a gorgeous brunette who takes him home…

Carmen Kelly wanted to be a hard-hitting journalist, only to find herself cast in the role of Empire’s sex columnist thanks to the boys’ club mentality of Manhattan magazines. Her latest piece is about an unfortunate―and unsatisfying―encounter with an awkward and nerdy guy, who was nice enough to look at but horribly inexperienced in bed.

Lucas only discovers that he’s slept with the infamous Carmen Kelly―that is, his own magazine’s sex columnist!―when he reads her printed take-down. Humiliated and furious, he pens a rebuttal and signs it, “Nice Guy.” Empire publishes it, and the pair of columns go viral. Readers demand more. So the magazine makes an arrangement: Each week, Carmen and Lucas will sleep together… and write dueling accounts of their sexual exploits.

It’s the most provocative sexual relationship any couple has had, but the columnist-lovers are soon engaging in more than a war of words: They become seduced by the city’s rich and powerful, tempted by fame, and more attracted to each other than they’re willing to admit. In the end, they will have to choose between ambition, love, and the consequences of total honesty.

Stacy London interviewing Jennifer Miller and Jason Feifer.

Feifer watching Miller dissect and discuss sex toys.

Miller and Feifer were kind enough to do a Q & A about their book and writing life. Here are some highlights:

What sparked the idea for this book, and was it always a given you’d work on it together?

Jason came up with the idea of having two people critique their sex lives like movie reviews years before we met. He’d been contacted by a younger writer who’d written the sex and relationships column for her college newspaper and wanted help breaking into professional journalism. During their (entirely vanilla) correspondence, Jason came up with the idea for Mr. Nice Guy. Over the years, he tried to start the book, but just didn’t feel comfortable writing fiction. What a boon that he married a novelist! He suggested that Jen take the idea if she liked it; she suggested they write the book together.

Was this the first project the two of you have worked on together? If yes, what was your process?

We frequently ask each other for professional advice and feedback. But Mr. Nice Guy was our first truly joint project. We developed the plot and characters together. Jen wrote the bulk of the narrative and Jason wrote all the columns. Then we edited each other’s work. We definitely weren’t typing over each other’s shoulders.

Did you have any hesitation sharing the intimacies of your relationship with readers and each other?

The book definitely forced us to open up about our dating and sex lives. It was actually a great way to discuss all that stuff—we had a reason to talk about it, which is a lot less awkward than simply saying over dinner, “so about last night’s sex…” Frankly, knowing that our parents would read this book was the most awkward aspect of the whole thing and is kind of horrifying.

What are the particular strengths each of you added to the novel?

Jen’s eye for detail and ear for satire captured the absurdity of NYC media culture and its brand of conspicuous consumption. Jason is great at turning conflict into comedy, which he did expertly in the columns written by our protagonists, Lucas and Carmen.

How excited are you to have sold the television rights to the novel? And who would you choose to star in the series?

OMG, so excited! It was amazing to have the producer of the movie Crash and the former head of NBC Universal on the phone outlining the first THREE seasons of our book-turned-TV show. Timothee Chalamet would make a great Lucas, our highly ambitious, sexually inexperienced male protagonist. Auli’i Cravalho would make a great Carmen.

Any more joint projects in the works?

We’ve plotted out a new novel about two political pundits on opposing sides who fall in love. Like last time, we plotted out the novel together. Jen is going to write the bulk of the narrative and Jason will write the couple’s contentious and absurd television appearances.

What will your 3-year-old son Fenn say about this book when he’s old enough to read it?

We hope that Fenn never reads this book!

For more about Mr. Nice Guy, visit Mr.NiceGuyNovel.com or Feifer’s website. The book is available wherever books are sold.

*Hosted by Hendricks Gin, Meltshop, The Balvenie, The Little Beet, Smart Water, Monkey Shoulder, and Fields Good Chicken.